The Epidemiology of Hernias in Tamale, Northern Ghana

Callistus B. Kuubiere *

Department of Human Biology, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University for Development Studies, P.O. Box TL 1883, Tamale, Ghana

Abass Alhassan

Department of Human Biology, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University for Development Studies, P.O. Box TL 1883, Tamale, Ghana

Victor Mogre

Department of Human Biology, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University for Development Studies, P.O. Box TL 1883, Tamale, Ghana

Saeed F. Majeed

Department of Human Biology, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University for Development Studies, P.O. Box TL 1883, Tamale, Ghana

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and the associated demographic characteristics of hernia cases seen at the Tania Specialist Hospital in Tamale, Northern Ghana.

Methodology: This retrospective study was conducted from January 2008 to December 2012 at the Tania Specialist Hospital. All patients admitted into the Tania Specialist Hospital for the repair of any type of hernia were included into the study.

Results: Out of the 1330 hernia patients, 92.9% were males (n=1236) and 90.7% (n=1206) were aged 21-40 years. The highest type of hernia recorded during the period under review were inguinal hernia (29.7%, n=395), incisional hernia (27.1%, n=350), recurrent hernia (20.1%, n=260) and epigastric hernia (20.9%, n=270). The highest incidence of all the types of hernia was recorded in 2011 and 2012. In all types of hernia, over 80% of the patients were aged 21-40 years. The incidence of hernia was 13 times higher in males than in females. Those patients aged 21-40 years had the highest incidence of all types of hernia seen.

 

Keywords: Epidemiology, hernia, Northern Ghana


How to Cite

B. Kuubiere, Callistus, Abass Alhassan, Victor Mogre, and Saeed F. Majeed. 2014. “The Epidemiology of Hernias in Tamale, Northern Ghana”. Advances in Research 3 (3):269-74. https://doi.org/10.9734/AIR/2015/11365.

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