Using Fidget Spinners and Stress Balls Do Not Impact College Introductory Psychology Test Scores

Terry F. Pettijohn II *

Department of Psychology, Coastal Carolina University, Conway, South Carolina, USA.

Victoria Riley-Lomedico

Department of Psychology, Coastal Carolina University, Conway, South Carolina, USA.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Aim: To determine if the use of fidget spinners and stress balls impact college test scores in Introductory Psychology courses. 

Study Design:  A between-participants experimental design was used.  Students were randomly assigned into conditions. 

Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at Coastal Carolina University, Conway, South Carolina, USA.  Fall semester.

Methodology: 170 college students enrolled in Introductory Psychology courses participated in the study.  Participants were randomly assigned to use a fidget spinner, a stress ball, or sit quietly for 3 minutes before a unit test in their Introductory Psychology course.

Results: Quantitative data was analyzed using SPSS.  There were no statistically significant differences in test scores between the three groups (P=.28).  The fidget spinner group (M=75.82,

SD=13.12), the stress ball group (M=76.41, SD=13.89), and the control group (M=79.33, SD=11.17) scored similarly to each other on the unit test.

Conclusion: Using fidget spinners or stress balls do not impact Introductory Psychology test scores.

Keywords: Fidget spinners, stress balls, intervention, students, universities


How to Cite

II , T. F. P., & Riley-Lomedico, V. (2023). Using Fidget Spinners and Stress Balls Do Not Impact College Introductory Psychology Test Scores. Advances in Research, 24(6), 9–13. https://doi.org/10.9734/air/2023/v24i6978

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